Album Reviews

Tom Eddy: The Bread Maker’s Blues EP

Tom Eddy

Within the first listen of his self-recorded and self-written EP, The Bread Maker’s Blues (2012), I realize that there is a lot to love about Tom Eddy’s music. His voice is instantly likable with his M. Wardian vocals in “Welfare”. And in “Sunday Market/Tear Down”, he not only gives a Dave Matthews vibe, but also establishes an extremely catchy backdrop of instrumentation and rhythm.

I truly appreciate that Eddy offers a different vocal flavor in each track, all the while maintaining his blues-infused folk roots. Toward the end of “Sunday Market/Teardown”, Tom Eddy’s vocals drops out and the band enters into a non-tonal escapade of piano musings over a simple guitar part that continually repeats and grows until the song’s fadeout.

Eddy then finds his jazz influence that is prevalent to his hometown of Seattle, Washington in “Her Lightening Storm”. He combines a slightly Latin jazz feel with emotion driven lyrics in the chorus, as he sings:

Love,
You’re in a lightning storm,
And nothings gonna save you but your low-down Love,
I don’t want any part of.

The next track, “Easy Putney (In Memory of Sue)”, contains a relaxing and comfortable acoustic guitar progression with an easy-listening piano solo over the top. While all of Tom Eddy’s tracks from this EP put me in a happy relaxed state, if you wish to unwind and chill, this is the song to listen to.

The EP’s title track and closer gives more of the staples — chill acoustic guitar and Eddy’s relaxing vocals — and like every other track on this EP, it brings something new to the table with the way it was recorded. Unlike the other tracks, “The Bread Maker’s Blues” sounds as if it was recorded in a live environment, allowing his guitar to really shine with each note ringing clearly and sounding as beautiful and clear as acoustic guitars are meant to sound.

This five song EP from Seattle-native Tom Eddy is relaxing, captivating and creative. It not only contains 5 tracks, but deserves 5 out of 5 stars. Well done, sir. And the band. Well done.

Leave a Reply